TUB-Talk – 28 March 2015

This week sees another test recording for TUB-Talk, with a weekly news drop.

Direct link to Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/universityboy/tub-talk-2015-03-28

As I say before the show starts, I’ll be pushing out a student show and a staff show, so I’d love to hear what you’d want out of an HE podcast. Would you like interviews, advice, news, opinion?

Let me know what would be of help and interest so I can make TUB-Talk just right for you.

Thanks for all the feedback so far. Keep it coming!

Here are the links to the stories mentioned in the podcast:

Social attitudes and tuition fees

Wonkhe – http://www.wonkhe.com/blogs/british-social-attitudes-survey-3-in-4-people-support-tuition-fees/
British Social Attitudes Survey (HE) – http://www.bsa.natcen.ac.uk/media/38917/bsa32_highereducation.pdf

Sir Patrick Stewart stepping down

Huddersfield Daily Examiner – http://www.examiner.co.uk/news/west-yorkshire-news/sir-patrick-stewart-step-down-8931509
BBC – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leeds-32086234

The consequences of cramming and all-nighters

The Tab Leicester – http://leicester.tab.co.uk/2015/03/25/this-warwick-graduate-did-his-entire-dissertation-in-one-forty-hour-sitting/
Telegraph – http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/11497143/Teens-cram-revision-into-one-night-survey-says.html

Low drop-out figures

Times Higher Education – http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/drop-out-rate-remains-at-record-low/2019319.article

Value for money

Impact – http://www.impactnottingham.com/2015/03/is-your-course-challenging-you-impact-investigates/
Telegraph – http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/11490809/Cost-of-a-degree-is-not-worth-it-says-Oxford-bursar.html

Schools, universities and employers building stronger relationships

Association of Graduate Recruiters – http://www.agr.org.uk/The-AGR-Manifesto

The library is my new jam

Oxford, Sounds of the Bodleian – https://www.ox.ac.uk/soundsofthebodleian/
David Kernohan on Twitter – https://twitter.com/dkernohan/status/581451309930414080

TUB-Talk Podcast Test. TheUniversityBlog turns TheUniversityPod…

With a new microphone to play with, I’ve put together a ‘news drop’ that will probably form part of a podcast I’m calling TUB-Talk.

The full podcast is likely to feature interviews, tips and lots of HE goodness.

Let me know what you think of this test by leaving a comment or getting in touch.

Link to Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/universityboy/tub-talk-2015-03-21

Here are the links to the stories mentioned in the podcast:

Recruiting More Students

http://www.theguardian.com/higher-education-network/2015/mar/18/almost-half-of-english-universities-plan-to-recruit-more-students-after-cap-is-lifted

New Postgraduate Loans Announced

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-31942262
http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/phd-loans-up-to-25k-announced-in-budget/2019210.article

PhD Writing Groups

http://patthomson.net/2015/03/19/4033/

Vice Chancellor Changes

http://oxfordstudent.com/2015/03/18/andrew-hamilton-to-resign/
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/19/nyregion/andrew-hamilton-to-succeed-john-sexton-as-president-of-nyu.html
http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/keele-university-promotes-deputy-v-c-to-top-job/2019217.article
http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/uuk-president-chris-snowden-to-be-next-southampton-v-c/2019223.article
http://www.mediafhe.com/pressure-and-pension-changes-drive-unprecedented-turnover-in-vcs

Simon Pegg Opens New Theatre At Bristol

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2015/march/richmond-building.html

Reading 20 Pages A Day

https://jamesclear.quora.com/How-to-Read-More-The-Simple-System-I%E2%80%99m-Using-to-Read-30+-Books-Per-Year

Thinking Too Much About Rankings

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/11482791/Top-US-academic-slams-UKs-fixation-with-rankings.html

Forming Habits & Myths About Changing Habits

http://www.fastcompany.com/3043854/how-to-be-a-success-at-everything/the-four-biggest-myths-about-changing-your-habits
https://hbr.org/2015/03/to-form-successful-habits-know-what-motivates-you

Gretchen Rubin’s book – Better Than Before: Mastering The Habits Of Our Everyday Lives

Counter-Extremism Strategy Dropped

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/mar/20/theresa-may-drops-rules-ordering-universities-ban-extremist-speakers
http://www.theguardian.com/education/2015/mar/13/oxford-and-cambridge-unions-exempted-from-terror-ban-on-extremist-speakers

Libraries, Birmingham and the ‘Digital Game’

http://theconversation.com/we-need-to-remember-that-libraries-are-about-books-not-business-35884

Finding Work Beyond Job Ads and Agencies

http://thewritelife.com/work-from-home-freelance-writers-find-work/

Chris Brogan’s book – The Freaks Shall Inherit The Earth

If there is anything you would like to hear in the podcast, let me know. I’d love to hear what would turn you into an avid listener!

When You Ask The Question, “Are Learning Technologies Fit For Purpose?” #digifest15

“Asking the question is probably the most important thing.”

Lawrie Phipps made the point as he finished chairing a debate over, “Are learning technologies fit for purpose?”

It may sound dull, but his point was the best way to sum up the session between Dave White and Donna Lanclos at the Jisc Digifest 2015.

Earlier in the day, Anna Notaro told me that she doesn’t like either/or questions. While it does help me write short and punchy tweets, I do agree.

So, are learning technologies fit for purpose?

It’s an impossible question, as it involves individual decisions as much as it does group decisions. It involves education providers and administrators as much as it does learners.

Do learning technologies fit YOUR purpose? Can these tools give you what you want? And if you don’t know what you want, is this method working for you?

Dave White said that learning technologists and other professionals forget how experienced and confident they are. He suggested that if you could go back to when you were 18–just starting out at university–you would be far less likely to have the same drive to make your point. The nervewracking experience of speaking in a lecture or seminar consisted mainly of trying not to make a fool out of yourself. Newbies to the system don’t want to fall at the first hurdle. There’s so much at stake, or so it feels anyway.

One solution is to provide safe spaces so that students can build their confidence. This requires a somewhat locked-in approach using internal systems, rather than pointing toward online services that can publish work for all the world to see.

key

Use a VLE or use WordPress? Donna Lanclos explained that institutions have made a promise to educate their students. Learning and subsequent application of publicly used resources will provide the best opportunity for students to develop worthwhile skills. Using a VLE, she argued, doesn’t provide the same learning opportunity. Lanclos expressed difficulty in seeing why it’s so difficult to assist students in confident use of open web tools and to invest money saved from ditching VLEs on hiring more staff instead.

Questions from the audience were useful, as they looked at the flaws in the either/or questioning:

  • Something isn’t fit for purpose, but what is it? Is it the technology, is it the institution, is it something else? This needs assessing.
  • Why are we talking about a choice? You can have both a VLE and an open web.
  • We need to equip people to be competent in the open web. This requires a continuum model. Not just about knowledge in terms of content, but which technologies to use and when?
  • The reason we have VLEs is due to standards issues. Until you can bring diversity together in a reasonable format, a VLE is a practical necessity.
  • What IS the purpose of learning technologies? They are fit for purpose only if you identify what their purpose is.
  • You may want to use a social service for personal reasons, but that doesn’t mean you wish to use it as part of your course.

Lanclos said that it’s important to take responsibility for students’ learning when they do not have the understanding or experience of necessary tools. So, she continued, why is that different via the open web than through a VLE? Her closing argument stated that university is a much more holistic project than VLEs allow for. The fact they are locked in ends up sheltering students from the outside world and more practical learning.

White closed by explaining that learning technologies reflect the purpose our institutions have chosen to take. They provide a platform to frame learning around the course, rather than the individual. People can be helped through the process of education.

This takes us back to the remark Lawrie Phipps made to close the session:

“Asking the question is probably the most important thing.”

I saw neither Lanclos nor White as particularly wrong in their assertions. Such an ambiguous and open question is important because it shows how diverse the student population has become over the decades. And yet, as one audience member remarked, pedagogy over the last 20 years hasn’t been particularly transformed.

Asking the question, “Are learning technologies fit for purpose?” is a great way to continue exploring transformation that requires technology. But rather than focus on the technology at the centre, focus on the learner, on society, and on the future.

Your Minimum Editing Route and How Fonts Can Help You Spot Typos

Your Minimum Editing Route

I work with words all the time. I have to be careful not to gloss over my writing. If I do, I risk missing typos and worse.

Even with a clear focus, it’s bad enough. Your focus is on conveying meaning more than it is on uncovering typos.

But there’s hope. When you edit your work, go through several runs at the text. First, read for overall flow. Second, read for clarity. Third, read for typos. This should be your minimum editing route.

Editing for different reasons each time helps you to focus on the particular task at hand. These tasks require thinking processes that do not gel with each other. If you tackle them all at the same time, it’s like ineffective multitasking.

Read out loud and look at each word, no matter how trivial. When you read with purpose, you’ll trip over sentences that clearly need reworking. When you look at each word, the mistakes stand out.

letter blocks

There’s another magic trick that’s easy and effective. Change font!

Yes, simply change the look of your text so it looks new to you.

Copy and paste your text into another document…You don’t want to mess about with your sparkly live document now, do you?

Then change the font. It doesn’t matter which font you choose, so long as you can read it. As you read through the draft, you’ll notice new things (both good and bad) as your brain is tricked into thinking it’s looking at a new document.

Try with different fonts until you find one that’s a good combination of readable and accessible for you to review. After a few uses, you may want to find a new font so you don’t get too familiar with any particular typeface. Once you’re used to it, you won’t be so effective when reviewing your draft.

My own method is to use a few good fonts and rotate their use. That way, I can use the same fonts and not get too familiar with them. I can even throw a curveball and use a completely different font on a particularly challenging piece of text. Anything to get me focused where it counts.

Which fonts would you recommend?

typefaces