Dissertation

Why Your Choice of Verb Helps You Evaluate a Text – TUB-Thump 034

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Do I demonstrate a point? Or do I merely claim it?

Sometimes you want to refer to a text in a positive light, while other times you want to pull back a bit on the emotion.

That’s where your choice of verbs comes in. The words you use in your coursework matter.

The super-useful pocket guide, Writing For University, by Jeanne Godfrey, describes the power of using different verbs to show “your evaluation of what the author does”.

Episode 034 of TUB-Thump checks out the different words you can use, depending on the message you want to convey. You need never again confuse someone illustrating and establishing something with someone claiming or assuming!

I believe you’ll find this useful. But, hey, I’ll now let you be the judge of that!


Music for TUB-Thump is Life, by Tobu, which is released under a Creative Commons license. Check out more of Tobu’s great sounds on Soundcloud, YouTube, and his official site.

TUB-Thump is part of the Learning Always Network.

Keep being awesome!

What’s the Best Way to Write Your Essay? That Depends on You. – TUB-Thump 027

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Do you like to plan ahead before you work, or do you like to crack on with a clean canvas?

I hadn’t really considered this so much until I’d seen a presentation by Tristram Hooley with various writing tips.

A couple of Hooley’s slides look at two different types of working that resonate with me, because they have a similar outlook to one of the ways I look at learning new things.

For learning, I like to look at the bigger picture and drill down to the details from there. But some people start with some choice details and work outward to uncover that big picture.

In many ways, how you choose to write may have similarities in that learning choice too. And that’s what I talk about in Episode 027 of TUB-Thump.

I wonder if you’ve read this plan of the episode first, or if you’ve jumped straight into listening. I guess that depends on how you like to do things!

What’s your choice?


Here are the show notes for the 5-min episode:

  • 01:00 – Tristram Hooley’s presentation: Writing. How, why, when and what?
  • 01:20 – Planning writers versus generative writers.
  • 01:55 – Make a plan and then write a first draft or write a first draft and make a plan off the back of it?
  • 02:30 – One of these ways of working is likely to work better for you than the other. But it’s always worth trying the other way of working to see what you can learn about your process.
    I’ve talked about that before. Hear more on Episode 023 of TUB-Thump, How to Change Your Perspective and Why That Change is Good.

Music for TUB-Thump is Life, by Tobu, which is released under a Creative Commons license. Check out more of Tobu’s great sounds on Soundcloud, YouTube, and his official site.

TUB-Thump is part of the Learning Always Network.

Keep being awesome!

Avoid the Trap of Consuming Everything Before You Start Creating

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How much research do you do for your coursework?

Do you power through and consume as much stuff as possible before getting on with the creation bit?

The more you can create out of what you consume, the more validation you give to consuming content. You won’t use all of it, but there comes a time when you stop looking.

But what if the search doesn’t seem to end?

The more you consume without creating anything from it, the more worrying the situation gets. Snacking on information without an end in sight.

Munch, munch, munch. One book here, another paper there, and a final web search just for luck. Maybe I’ll check the library one more time.

And maybe another time after that…

And it goes on.

When you consume far more than you create, you face a bottleneck at best. The reality is likely worse.

Words like “perfectionism” and “procrastination” start to rear their ugly heads.

Consuming without getting anything valuable out of the process is wasteful. It happens to all of us on occasion, but it shouldn’t be a standard part of your research process.

And you can easily fall into that consumption trap. So watch out.

It feels productive to find lots to read in the library and online, but it merely gets in the way when you’re not using that content for your work.

Keep an eye on why you’re still researching. There are times when you need to look at far more than you’ll refer to, because you’re looking for inspiration or perspective. Or perhaps you’re considering several arguments before you put your own stamp on proceedings.

But make sure you’re not still consuming ALL THE THINGS simply because:

  • You’re scared to start creating;
  • You think you need to cover every possible angle that exists (hint: you don’t);
  • You’re putting off the next stage of your work;
  • You need to find a better research process to work with.

Reasons like those above aren’t good enough to keep you looking for more. Work with what you’ve got, or improve your process so it’s not so time-consuming.

You may have to be brutally honest with yourself. It’s not easy to admit, especially when you are afraid to start.

But when the pressure gets too much, remember that you can always start off without doing any in-depth research at all.

Work with what you’ve got. So long as you’ve had some input from lectures, seminars, set texts, and so on, you should have enough to get started.

And writing your own thoughts and ideas on the page is much better than staring at a blank screen. Or, worse, not even reaching the blank screen stage because you’re busy feeling overwhelmed by how much information is already out there.

When you do your research, go in with the aim of creating something soon. No need to get hold of all the research materials and quotations before you start your own creation.

Banish those bottlenecks. Find a flow that doesn’t involve all the writing at the very end of the process.

A drip-feed of research helps a lot of the information stay at the top of your mind. That, in turn, will get you engaging (and referring) to more of that research.

The more you practice this flow, the more you will create out of what you have consumed.

When Academia and Pokémon Collide

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Pointless can be serious. You can go a long way with pointless.

Look at Pokémon Go. It’s a game.

But it’s a game that sent Nintendo’s market value up to nearly double what it was a week before. It passed Sony’s market value, which wouldn’t have been expected before the Pokémon craze hit.

Pointless can be serious. You can go a long way with pointless.

Even if it starts off as a joke.

Pokémon Go started off as an April Fool, when Google put a video out about a Pokémon Challenge.

Earlier this year, a Durham student submitted a dissertation about the Kardashian family.

It started off as a bit of a laugh too.

Eliza Cummings said, “I wanted to pick [a topic] I would never get bored of”.

And despite having some detractors, Cummings ran with it and took it seriously. Serious fun.

Now she has graduated from Durham… With a first class honours.

None of this is as crazy as it sounds. If you pick a topic that won’t bore you, it’s much easier to find new angles, to keep pushing on with the work, and taking pride in what you do.

Not so pointless now. You can go a long way with pointless.

Understanding the dissertation is serious work, but adding fun and interest is similar to how some academics would view their work. They take matters seriously, yet enjoy what they do. It’s easy to find academics who are enthusiastic about their subject and the specialisms they’re looking into.

I once submitted an essay about writers who viewed the industrial revolution negatively, but instead gave an argument that they were likely in favour of the industrial revolution.

Why?

Because it was fun.

I had to put effort in, because the argument had to make sense. I needed to show the working behind it.

So before you see nothing more than a story about ridiculous dissertations, consider the further possibility behind the subject.

If someone happened to write about the Kardashians for a laugh, they might get bored anyway. The academic side would become a drain.

Cummings may have seen the funny side, but she clearly saw the serious side too.

When I studied postcolonialism, the class were allowed to choose one text to study. I asked if we could study South Park: The Movie. It had recently come out and I thought it would be fun AND relevant AND topical.

So our tutor said yes. Half the class were delighted and had fun with it. The other half thought we were being ridiculous.

All I know is that I was happy to have a laugh, because I knew there was a good reason to take it seriously.

Learning requires emotion. If there’s no fun involved, you may be missing out. Get emotional with your study!

Where could you choose to have some fun with your work today?