When Academia and Pokémon Collide

academia & pokemon

Pointless can be serious. You can go a long way with pointless.

Look at Pokémon Go. It’s a game.

But it’s a game that sent Nintendo’s market value up to nearly double what it was a week before. It passed Sony’s market value, which wouldn’t have been expected before the Pokémon craze hit.

Pointless can be serious. You can go a long way with pointless.

Even if it starts off as a joke.

Pokémon Go started off as an April Fool, when Google put a video out about a Pokémon Challenge.

Earlier this year, a Durham student submitted a dissertation about the Kardashian family.

It started off as a bit of a laugh too.

Eliza Cummings said, “I wanted to pick [a topic] I would never get bored of”.

And despite having some detractors, Cummings ran with it and took it seriously. Serious fun.

Now she has graduated from Durham… With a first class honours.

None of this is as crazy as it sounds. If you pick a topic that won’t bore you, it’s much easier to find new angles, to keep pushing on with the work, and taking pride in what you do.

Not so pointless now. You can go a long way with pointless.

Understanding the dissertation is serious work, but adding fun and interest is similar to how some academics would view their work. They take matters seriously, yet enjoy what they do. It’s easy to find academics who are enthusiastic about their subject and the specialisms they’re looking into.

I once submitted an essay about writers who viewed the industrial revolution negatively, but instead gave an argument that they were likely in favour of the industrial revolution.

Why?

Because it was fun.

I had to put effort in, because the argument had to make sense. I needed to show the working behind it.

So before you see nothing more than a story about ridiculous dissertations, consider the further possibility behind the subject.

If someone happened to write about the Kardashians for a laugh, they might get bored anyway. The academic side would become a drain.

Cummings may have seen the funny side, but she clearly saw the serious side too.

When I studied postcolonialism, the class were allowed to choose one text to study. I asked if we could study South Park: The Movie. It had recently come out and I thought it would be fun AND relevant AND topical.

So our tutor said yes. Half the class were delighted and had fun with it. The other half thought we were being ridiculous.

All I know is that I was happy to have a laugh, because I knew there was a good reason to take it seriously.

Learning requires emotion. If there’s no fun involved, you may be missing out. Get emotional with your study!

Where could you choose to have some fun with your work today?