#voteforstudents – More than just a hashtag

Earlier today from 12.00, the Twitter hashtag #voteforstudents started trending worldwide.

#voteforstudents became the second most popular topic tweeted in the UK  within minutes. And for good reason too.

The Vote For Students website, set up by NUS (National Union of  Students) asks students to vote in the forthcoming general  election to support candidates who won’t support an increase in student fees.

The purpose of today’s Twitter event was to make the cause known and help spur students on to vote.  The student population is  huge.  Students represent 15% of the voting population, but many do not vote.  By coming together on a cause like this, students can make a big difference through their united voice.

In addition to this, the Vote For Students campaign puts pressure on political parties to speak up about the future of funding in  Higher Education.

Among the great Tweets were:

#voteforstudents  now at number two in UK trending topics, but it will be the number one thing on students minds on polling day – @estellehart

You don’t have to be a student, pledge your vote now to honest candidates at www.voteforstudents.co.uk #voteforstudents – @andrewhenrynus

We don’t want a country where poor institutions teaching poor students get poorer and vice versa #voteforstudents – @jim_dickinson

#voteforstudents  is about mobilising the student vote with the  immediate aim of stopping any increase in uni fees. – @johnpeart

#voteforstudents  isn’t just for students you can sign up today  too if you care about the future of education in the UK – @marktweets

Because if fees rise then most of us are screwed for the housing  ladder and pensions #voteforstudents – @AliceBouquet

The student vote could change the result of the next election.  Make sure our voices are heard. #voteforstudents – @uclansu

We could swing the general election…there’s 7 million in @nusuk  ‘s membership! #voteforstudents – @DannieGruff

great that #voteforstudents is trending. But it’s vital students sign up http://www.voteforstudents.co.uk & vote! – @AaronPorter

I did notice a couple of criticisms along the way too:

#voteforstudents  campaign and NUS should focus on getting students to vote, since 50% say they wont, rather than promoting their own agenda – @owenlmeredith

Impressed with the successful effort to get #voteforstudents to trend globally. Though a short tweetable manifesto would be useful. – @technicalfault

Today’s campaign to create a Twitter trending topic is one way in many that interested parties (not just NUS) are reaching out to  students to ask for their vote…and for their vote to actually count.

As for a tweetable manifesto, many Tweets were going out with the Vote For Students website linked, but @technicalfault does make a  fair point.  I’m sure if NUS were to set up a similar event, they’d consider something like this.

And I can well imagine NUS will do this again.  The outcome of the event wasn’t certain, but to trend so successfully in the UK and  around the world is a big deal given Twitter’s 40 million Tweets per day! [Update: Just a few days later, let’s make that 50 million Tweets!]

Congratulations to all who helped make #voteforstudents a top trending topic.

Now do we all go back to normal? NO. It’s time to make a difference. That’s what today was all about.  We all need to use our vote wisely.

Earlier today from 12.00, the Twitter hashtag #voteforstudents

started trending worldwide.

#voteforstudents became the second most popular topic in the UK

within minutes. And for good reason too.

The Vote For Students website, set up by NUS (National Union of

Students) asks students to vote in the forthcoming general

election to support candidates who won’t support an increase in

student fees.

The purpose of today’s Twitter event was to make the cause known

and help spur students on to vote.  The student population is

huge.  Students represent 15% of the voting population, but many

do not vote.  By coming together on a cause like this, students

can make a big difference through their united voice.

In addition to this, the Vote For Students campaign put pressure

on political parties to speak up about the future of funding in

Higher Education.

Among the Tweets were these:
#voteforstudents  now at number two in UK trending topics, but it

will the number one thing on students minds on polling day –

@estellehart http://twitter.com/estellehart/status/9281341191

You don’t have to be a student, pledge your vote now to honest

candidates at http://www.voteforstudents.co.uk #voteforstudents –

@andrewhenrynus

We don’t want a country where poor institutions teaching poor

students get poorer and vice versa #voteforstudents

http://www.voteforstudents.co.uk – @jim_dickinson

#voteforstudents  is about mobilising the student vote with the

immediate aim of stopping any increase in uni fees.

http://www.voteforstudents.co.uk – @johnpeart

#voteforstudents  isn’t just for students you can sign up today

too if you care about the future of education in the UK

voteforstudents.co.uk – @marktweets

Because if fees rise then most of us are screwed for the housing

ladder and pensions #voteforstudents – @AliceBouquet

The student vote could change the result of the next election.

Make sure our voices are heard: http://www.voteforstudents.co.uk

#voteforstudents – @uclansu

We could swing the general election…there’s 7 million in @nusuk

‘s membership! #voteforstudents – @DannieGruff

I did notice a couple of criticisms along the way too:
#voteforstudents  campaign and NUS should focus on getting

students to vote, since 50% say they wont, rather than promoting

their own agenda – @owenlmeredith

Impressed with the successful effort to get #voteforstudents  to

trend globally. Though a short tweetable manifesto would be

useful. – @technicalfault

Today’s campaign to create a Twitter trending topic is one way in

many that interested parties (not just NUS) are reaching out to

students to ask for their vote…and for their vote to actually

count.

As for a tweetable manifesto, many Tweets were going out with the

Vote For Students website linked, but @technicalfault does make a

fair point.  I’m sure if NUS were to set up a similar event,

they’d consider something like this.

And I can well imagine NUS will do this again.  The outcome of the

event wasn’t certain, but to trend so successfully in the UK and

around the world is a big deal given Twitter’s 40 million Tweets

per day!

http://royal.pingdom.com/2010/02/10/twitter-now-more-than-1-billio

n-tweets-per-month/

Congratulations to all who helped make #voteforstudents a top

trending topic.

Now do we all go back to normal? NO. It’s time to make a

difference. That’s what today was all about.  Let’s use our vote

wisely!