Policy

TUB-Talk Podcast Test. TheUniversityBlog turns TheUniversityPod…

With a new microphone to play with, I’ve put together a ‘news drop’ that will probably form part of a podcast I’m calling TUB-Talk.

The full podcast is likely to feature interviews, tips and lots of HE goodness.

Let me know what you think of this test by leaving a comment or getting in touch.

Link to Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/universityboy/tub-talk-2015-03-21

Here are the links to the stories mentioned in the podcast:

Recruiting More Students

http://www.theguardian.com/higher-education-network/2015/mar/18/almost-half-of-english-universities-plan-to-recruit-more-students-after-cap-is-lifted

New Postgraduate Loans Announced

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-31942262
http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/phd-loans-up-to-25k-announced-in-budget/2019210.article

PhD Writing Groups

http://patthomson.net/2015/03/19/4033/

Vice Chancellor Changes

http://oxfordstudent.com/2015/03/18/andrew-hamilton-to-resign/
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/19/nyregion/andrew-hamilton-to-succeed-john-sexton-as-president-of-nyu.html
http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/keele-university-promotes-deputy-v-c-to-top-job/2019217.article
http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/uuk-president-chris-snowden-to-be-next-southampton-v-c/2019223.article
http://www.mediafhe.com/pressure-and-pension-changes-drive-unprecedented-turnover-in-vcs

Simon Pegg Opens New Theatre At Bristol

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2015/march/richmond-building.html

Reading 20 Pages A Day

https://jamesclear.quora.com/How-to-Read-More-The-Simple-System-I%E2%80%99m-Using-to-Read-30+-Books-Per-Year

Thinking Too Much About Rankings

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/11482791/Top-US-academic-slams-UKs-fixation-with-rankings.html

Forming Habits & Myths About Changing Habits

http://www.fastcompany.com/3043854/how-to-be-a-success-at-everything/the-four-biggest-myths-about-changing-your-habits
https://hbr.org/2015/03/to-form-successful-habits-know-what-motivates-you

Gretchen Rubin’s book – Better Than Before: Mastering The Habits Of Our Everyday Lives

Counter-Extremism Strategy Dropped

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/mar/20/theresa-may-drops-rules-ordering-universities-ban-extremist-speakers
http://www.theguardian.com/education/2015/mar/13/oxford-and-cambridge-unions-exempted-from-terror-ban-on-extremist-speakers

Libraries, Birmingham and the ‘Digital Game’

http://theconversation.com/we-need-to-remember-that-libraries-are-about-books-not-business-35884

Finding Work Beyond Job Ads and Agencies

http://thewritelife.com/work-from-home-freelance-writers-find-work/

Chris Brogan’s book – The Freaks Shall Inherit The Earth

If there is anything you would like to hear in the podcast, let me know. I’d love to hear what would turn you into an avid listener!

When You Ask The Question, “Are Learning Technologies Fit For Purpose?” #digifest15

“Asking the question is probably the most important thing.”

Lawrie Phipps made the point as he finished chairing a debate over, “Are learning technologies fit for purpose?”

It may sound dull, but his point was the best way to sum up the session between Dave White and Donna Lanclos at the Jisc Digifest 2015.

Earlier in the day, Anna Notaro told me that she doesn’t like either/or questions. While it does help me write short and punchy tweets, I do agree.

So, are learning technologies fit for purpose?

It’s an impossible question, as it involves individual decisions as much as it does group decisions. It involves education providers and administrators as much as it does learners.

Do learning technologies fit YOUR purpose? Can these tools give you what you want? And if you don’t know what you want, is this method working for you?

Dave White said that learning technologists and other professionals forget how experienced and confident they are. He suggested that if you could go back to when you were 18–just starting out at university–you would be far less likely to have the same drive to make your point. The nervewracking experience of speaking in a lecture or seminar consisted mainly of trying not to make a fool out of yourself. Newbies to the system don’t want to fall at the first hurdle. There’s so much at stake, or so it feels anyway.

One solution is to provide safe spaces so that students can build their confidence. This requires a somewhat locked-in approach using internal systems, rather than pointing toward online services that can publish work for all the world to see.

key

Use a VLE or use WordPress? Donna Lanclos explained that institutions have made a promise to educate their students. Learning and subsequent application of publicly used resources will provide the best opportunity for students to develop worthwhile skills. Using a VLE, she argued, doesn’t provide the same learning opportunity. Lanclos expressed difficulty in seeing why it’s so difficult to assist students in confident use of open web tools and to invest money saved from ditching VLEs on hiring more staff instead.

Questions from the audience were useful, as they looked at the flaws in the either/or questioning:

  • Something isn’t fit for purpose, but what is it? Is it the technology, is it the institution, is it something else? This needs assessing.
  • Why are we talking about a choice? You can have both a VLE and an open web.
  • We need to equip people to be competent in the open web. This requires a continuum model. Not just about knowledge in terms of content, but which technologies to use and when?
  • The reason we have VLEs is due to standards issues. Until you can bring diversity together in a reasonable format, a VLE is a practical necessity.
  • What IS the purpose of learning technologies? They are fit for purpose only if you identify what their purpose is.
  • You may want to use a social service for personal reasons, but that doesn’t mean you wish to use it as part of your course.

Lanclos said that it’s important to take responsibility for students’ learning when they do not have the understanding or experience of necessary tools. So, she continued, why is that different via the open web than through a VLE? Her closing argument stated that university is a much more holistic project than VLEs allow for. The fact they are locked in ends up sheltering students from the outside world and more practical learning.

White closed by explaining that learning technologies reflect the purpose our institutions have chosen to take. They provide a platform to frame learning around the course, rather than the individual. People can be helped through the process of education.

This takes us back to the remark Lawrie Phipps made to close the session:

“Asking the question is probably the most important thing.”

I saw neither Lanclos nor White as particularly wrong in their assertions. Such an ambiguous and open question is important because it shows how diverse the student population has become over the decades. And yet, as one audience member remarked, pedagogy over the last 20 years hasn’t been particularly transformed.

Asking the question, “Are learning technologies fit for purpose?” is a great way to continue exploring transformation that requires technology. But rather than focus on the technology at the centre, focus on the learner, on society, and on the future.

What Are Student Perceptions Of Debt?

This week has been National Student Money Week. So there’s no better time (if there is ever a GOOD time!) to talk about student debt. *shudder*

what are student perceptions of debt

Living costs are an issue just as much fees, if not more so. Hidden course costs, social outlay, not to mention basic needs like food, drink and accommodation; it all adds up. And the more it adds up, the more likely students are to get into debt.

Now a new report suggests that graduates may end up repaying tens of thousands more on their student loans. It’s no wonder some people are put off attending university.

While student loans constitute a special type of debt that only begins to be repaid once a graduate is earning more than £21,000, it is still seen by many as a scary debt. A debt that has little chance of going away until 30 years have passed.

Debt is a common concern

The UNITE Student Experience Survey 2014 discovered that many applicants feel in the dark regarding their finances. And while current students have a much better view of their finances, only 56% state that their financial streams are sufficient. That still leaves nearly a quarter (24%) of undergraduate respondents saying their finances are not sufficient, and another fifth uncertain of their position.

Couple this with the survey’s finding that finances are the most frequent concern for students whilst at university and it is clear that a sizeable proportion of students are not comfortable with their debt experiences.

A surprising 28% of students polled claimed not to have any debt whatsoever. Does the high proportion suggest that not all debt is necessarily considered a debt? For instance, undergraduates are far more likely to use bank overdrafts than applicants assume will be the case (28% of students, compared with 11% of applicants). Given the percentage of respondents claiming not to have been in any debt whatsoever, it could be that they do not even see an overdraft as a debt in the first place.

bank notes

Fear doesn’t always lead to confrontation

So where does that leave perceptions of debt? Although tuition fees have been the focus of much national media coverage, it is unlikely that students see fees as an area where savings can be made.

Because while tuition fees are variable, up to £9,000, institutions tend to charge close to the maximum anyway. Students do not see enough difference between universities to influence their choices. One study also suggests that bursaries and other financial incentives are rarely investigated until much later in the process, if at all.

This suggests that many applicants have background fears about debt, but do not confront them. This may be due to a lack of time, or a failure to see the importance of such a worry. One way or another, financial concerns make an impact on behaviour that is sometimes indirect and unconscious.

Money and debt are, therefore, motivators that can work in negative ways. But attitudes and perceptions are difficult to work out without detailed, lengthy, costly research.

HEFCE analyses POLAR3 codes, which refer to postcode areas where people are more or less likely to participate in higher education. We can use these to assess educational disadvantages regarding HE, although HEFCE state that POLAR3 codes are not a reliable indication of disadvantaged areas in general. Nevertheless, it was interesting to see no notable differences from respondents to the UNITE survey regarding attitudes toward debt across the POLAR3 codes.

The survey did find some differences. Those in category 1 of POLAR3 (least likely to be participating in HE) were found more likely to be thinking about their job or career, as well as thinking about their family. Those in category 5 (most likely to participate) were more likely to live in university halls than categories 1 and 2.

Despite these findings, group 1 respondents were less likely to state that their intention to live at home was driven by it being more affordable. This is backed up by research that found that fear of debt was not a reliable predictor of staying at home for university to save money. What we cannot tell behind this is whether indirect and unconscious attitudes played a hidden part in the process.

The same research, by Callender and Jackson, also stated that low-income students were more likely to see the cost of their university experience as a debt and not an investment.

This difference between investment and debt can make an impact on student decisions. A 2010 Policy Exchange report stated that it is difficult for students to make rational decisions surrounding university when debts are involved. The report said, “At present such data is worryingly thin, and would-be students are left largely in the dark about many questions that they consider to be important”.

money close up

Information alone is not enough

Fast forward to 2015 again and policy has developed that centres on providing more information to prospective students through as they form the ‘heart of the system’. From Key Information Sets to improved support services once on campus, one thing students don’t seem to be lacking in is information.

But does all this upfront information make much difference to perceptions of debt? Do applicants feel reassured by promises of good value, good resources, and good job prospects?

Callender argues that information alone is not enough to improve the student experience. She also says that the game has changed, calling the 2012/13 reforms ‘more extreme’. For those in less advantaged positions, Callender suggests that the new system is more likely to reduce their chances of entering higher education and that HE could become more elitist rather than inclusive.

It’s clear that certain perceptions of debt can lead to decisions that are not always in the best interests of the individual. What is less clear is understanding who is most at risk and how they reached that perception of debt. We may find that the same concerns result in vastly different actions. Some people will not go to university at all, while others attend but tread a careful path. Others may ignore their situation altogether until it is too late.

We should stop and think carefully about this uncertainty. It is easy to shrug off when application figures to university are still healthy despite £9k fees. But that is not the whole picture. A worrying number of students will experience university in such a way that is potentially detrimental to their participation in HE and to their future beyond university.

Debt isn’t going away, so perceptions make a difference. For those 44% of students from the Unite Student Survey with uncertain or insufficient finances, it is vital to ensure that they not only receive advice and guidance where necessary, but also gain support to improve their personal perceptions of debt.

Nobody enjoys being in debt so it is crucial that students understand different types of debt and shape their perceptions of them accordingly. Only then can students respond in a way that gives them the best chance of dealing with their situation positively.

This article arose from a data hackathon, run by Unite Students and NUS Services in partnership with Wonkhe. The dataset is drawn from the Students Matter survey conducted Dec 2013-Jan 2014 by NUS Services and published in May 2014 by Unite Students.

Do Standardised Online Classes Have A Place In Higher Education?

Laptop and Books - Standardised Classes

I saw a CCAP piece on Forbes which looked at standardising classes and replacing the need for some teaching staff. The piece asked, “…what is the point of having instructors in the classroom if a computer can teach everything?

Does this computer-based format constitute higher education? By standardising classes, you deliberately restrict what can be gained through the class. Not the best start when we’re talking higher education.

However, there is a place for this type of learning. Some examples:

  • Helps promote some aspects of lifelong learning;
  • Useful for already standardised practices and areas that do not require multiple avenues of thought until further down the line;
  • Allows access to those who do not have access any other way than this.

The CCAP article goes on to say that not all classes can be standardised like this and some will struggle in any online format. But for those classes that can be amended to suit a standardised, online format, the decreased teaching costs could help students through smaller tuition costs and/or better services.

Standardisation could also pave the way for recognised qualifications. A new HEA report on MOOCs in the UK states that online learning could play a bigger part if courses were officially recognised:

“Accreditation of learning that attracts UCAS points is necessary if MOOCs are to become part of the landscape of higher education and provide a route to the full range of higher level learning. HE providers should work at putting this into place.” – p.9

The report, by Julie Wintrup, Kelly Wakefield and Hugh Davis, warns that the current lack of academic recognition does not allow MOOCs to play a part in widening access to higher education. Once you bridge that gap, there may be greater acceptance of this pathway to learning in the beginning stages of higher education. It could also form the basis to introduce qualifications that support higher education but do not form an entire degree programme. Standardised classes may play a part here.

Finding new routes to learning

This is clearly not an ‘all or nothing’ approach. Online learning can work in ways that face-to-face might not. MOOCs can take on both a standardised and an exploratory framework. In order to support diversity and widening participation, there should be multiple ways to keep the learning arena open.

For now, there is no easy way to support this to such a large extent. A report to the European Commission on new modes of learning and teaching in HE laments the many difficulties surrounding new methods of provision, but stresses how important it is to pursue their potential, “…given the opportunities that they offer for lifelong learning, continuing professional development and internationalisation“.

Their plea is for greater support and less derision. Solutions are not yet clear cut, but a dismissive attitude at this stage may stop us from finding out whether or not anything is feasible.

The UUK Student Funding Panel is currently seeking evidence on how they can “ensure the higher education system is sufficiently diverse and flexible to deliver an outstanding learning experience to all students“. The recent decline in part-time students, coupled with the lack of incentive to offer alternative routes to HE, means that some people will be locked out, despite a desire to continue learning. Perhaps there is a place for standardised classes and accredited online learning here.

UUK certainly sees the possibility, even before the funding panel evidence is through. The 2014 Patterns and Trends in UK Higher Education, states that the decline in part-time and distance learning enrolments does not paint the full picture:

“Online courses such as MOOCs also represent more informal and accessible forms of distance learning being offered by universities that are not recorded in distance learning statistics.”

So there’s still a long way to come, but potential is there. While the limited reporting on MOOC participation currently suggests that these courses are most likely to be taken by those who are already graduates, the future for widening participation may still have a place.

MOOCs and “exaggerated promises”

Don’t expect things to move too quickly though. Very little in this sense manages to come from overnight change.

The hype and rhetoric around MOOCs that reached national and international press resulted in anti-climax and many an EdTech ‘told-you-so’, but a calmer long-term approach should be more useful for all involved.

On the other hand, shouldn’t we also take into account the fantastic opportunities available online that are deliberately not standardised? Courses that triumph community and collaboration over qualifications and careers? Lee Skallerup Bessette wasn’t keen on her MOOC experiences, yet she has found much to like (and learn) elsewhere online:

“From the Maker Movement to Learning to Code from Scratch, there are communities out there to support learners, rather than just transmit information to them. We can learn from each other, support one another, and share our trials and triumphs. Professional development doesn’t have to be expensive, didactic, and a chore anymore. It can be an opportunity to help your faculty, school, and students open up to the world.” [Source – Educating Modern Learners, “14 posts from 2014″]

There is room for all sorts of initiatives. And if both universities and students can benefit from online learning of whatever appearance, this is cause for celebration.

But, as Martin Weller states in his new book, “The Battle For Open“, most discussion around MOOCs has been within a framework of replacing university altogether. He explains that this “exaggerated promise” has led to resistance, rather than an interest in “the more nuanced reality they may offer”.

Online learning is just one part of higher education. It is growing and it is changing as it grows. If a computer can teach everything in one area, let it do the teaching. If it requires a vast and diverse community, host it online and let people explore.

Just make sure that focus is not lost on the areas that can or should thrive through face-to-face interaction. The idea isn’t simply to replace, since learning constitutes everything around us. Online isn’t the only way, just as face-to-face isn’t either. There are countless possibilities.

We are still working out what can be done and how to facilitate learning for the benefit of students and tutors. I can’t imagine innovations and ideas ever coming to a halt. Martin Weller warns that we must not abdicate responsibility and ownership. It is crucial that we continue to explore new learning opportunities rather than concede them to others.

That, for me, is the most important point. We’re learning how to learn to learn. It may get messy and meta. And that’s marvellous.

opportunities